“I,Too”: Celebrating Black History Month

I promised back in January to publish a link to a project I have poured much love and devotion into- an experiential learning guide I created that focuses on African American literature and local places of interest that students (or anyone!) can explore with their families. The goal of this project as it relates to my personal field (education) is to foster the school-family-community nexxus that supports learning outcomes for students. The goal as it relates to this blog- to guide you toward some excellent resources for Black History in the DC area in conjunction with a month in which we celebrate this important contribution to our national identity.

I’m an English teacher, and I have a theory that all English teachers have one particular area of literature they love the most. Mine happens to be African American literature, a particularly vibrant yet often overlooked subset of American literature. African American literature provides valuable contribution to what it means to “be American,” and it’s often underutilized in school curriculums. My goal for this project, and in posting it here, is to introduce readers to some of my favorite African American writers and try to bring their voices to life. In the still-relevant words of Langston Hughes, “I, too, am America.”

If you’re interested in exploring this area of literature a bit more, here is the link to the Google slides version of my project: “”I,Too”: Bringing to Life the Voices of African American Writers.” I very much would have liked to include many, many more writers from many, many more eras, but at some point the project became unwieldy and needed to be capped. I have included some of my absolute favorites, including Frederick Douglass (who, contrary to our president’s comments, is NOT alive and has been getting attention for… over 100 years already), Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, and my absolute favorite favorite favorite, Zora Neale Hurston. I hope you find something useful in this guide and that it in some small way serves its purpose of honoring these incredible voices.

 

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